Tag Archives: Outdoors


Meet Jamie Junker – Endurance Athlete

Meet Jamie Junker, CanPrev Ambassador, Alberta native, and Mountain Endurance Athlete.

Jamie is a rock climber, alpine climber, free solo climber, and mountaineer. The CanPrev Team thinks he’s more of a monkey, but you can decide for yourself.

Conquering the Canadian Rockies

Jamie discovering mountain running was like finding buried treasure; the excitement and thrill is just as monkeys finding bananas. Starting his mountain adventures at the age of 30, Jamie realized that rock climbing, mountain climbing, and alpine running allows him to explore his full athletic potential, where he strives to be healthier and in turn, improve his athletic performance.

Regardless of the weather, Jamie is out on the mountains. His goal is to climb every single mountain within a 200 kilometre radius of Banff, and is always aiming to become faster and stronger through intense training and healthy lifestyle. The adrenaline during his climbs and feelings of accomplishment at the peak is what drives his desire to attain a healthy and fit body, so that he can be the best possible version of himself.

Jamie Junker (2)

A Memorable Mountain Adventure

There is no easy way to reach the summit of Mount Louis near Banff, Alberta. It is an alpine climb in which most experienced parties spend 8-12 hours to complete. For Jamie’s high intensity free-solo climb, he managed to achieve a time of 5 hours and 30 minutes, round trip, that included alpine climbing and rappelling, reaching an elevation of over 1,500m high. Though happy with this climb, Jamie hopes to return and conquer Mount Louis in less than 4 hours.

Jamie Junker (1)

Words from Jamie

“Fitness and athletics are my life. There’s no feeling quite like making it to the top of a rock climbing route. When you get to the summit of a mountain, look down and see a tiny speck, which you realize is your car, you wonder how it’s even possible to accomplish that. You’re in a state of euphoria and you feel so connected to your own body and your environment. It’s incredibly addicting.” – Jamie Junker

Jamie’s Favourites

Natural products that give awesome results are the best. The reason why Jamie loves CanPrev is because everything is so raw. It helps him to stay energized during his trek and promote faster recovery after each trip, so that he can move forward to conquer the next Canadian Rocky Mountain!

Adrenal Pro

ElectroMag

CORE Daily Performance Shake for Men

Jamie Junker (3)

Connect with Jamie:

In the hot summer weather, Jamie can be found jumping from peak to peak, climbing up slabs of rock, or poking his head through soft chilly fog; where in the cold Canadian winters, he can be spotted ice climbing up the rocky mountains, digging pits in the ground as shelters, or swiftly skiing through puffy white snow.

Year-round, you can catch him taking selfies of his epic adventures. Check him out!

Facebook  /  Instagram  /  Website

 

 

Best Practices for Summer BBQ’s and Healthier Grilled Meat

Don’t Summer and BBQ’s just go hand-in-hand together?

Grilling just seems to make food taste better, no matter what you cook on the BBQ…meat, poultry, vegetables, even fruit! These foods all taste amazing when prepared on a smokey grill.

However, consuming grilled food too often in the form of muscle meat (beef, pork, poultry, and fish) can come with some risks.

When muscle meat is cooked at high temperatures, chemicals known as heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed.

These known carcinogens can cause changes in your DNA and, in turn, increase your risk of developing cancer if consumed in high doses, according to some studies.

Because barbecuing is usually hotter than other cooking methods, grilled food typically contains higher levels of these chemicals than food prepared using other techniques such as baking or broiling.

We’re going to offer up some best practices for your summer BBQ, as well as how to enjoy healthier grilled meat. But first…

Let’s learn more about HCAs and PAHs…

HETEROCYCLIC AMINES (HCAs)
HCAs are formed as a result of a chemical reaction that occurs during the cooking process – this is the creatine, amino acids, and sugars in muscle meat react to high temperatures.

Therefore, grilled meat is more likely to have higher levels of HCAs than meat prepared other ways, and even more so when meat is overcooked or charbroiled.

The following factors influence the formation of HCAs:

  • Temperature (the most important – especially muscle meat cooked above 300°)
  • The type of meat (carcinogens are typically formed in muscle meat)
  • How long the muscle meat is cooked (the longer the food is cooked, the more HCAs are formed)
  • How the muscle meat is cooked (grilling vs. roasting, stewing, and steaming)

POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHs)
Exposing muscle meat directly to smoke is what contributes to the formation of PAHs.

PAH’s are also produced when meat is charred or blackened, or when fat from muscle meat drips onto the hot coals and the surface of the grill, which in turn forms PAHs in the smoke.

This smoke then infiltrates the food with PAHs as it rises. PAHs can also be found in other smoked foods, such as smoked meat & fish.

The following factors influence the formation of PAHs:

    • Temperature (the most important – especially muscle meat cooked above 200°)
    • How long the muscle meat is cooked (the longer the food is cooked, the more PAHs are formed)
    • How the muscle meat is cooked (grilling vs. baking or roasting)
    • The type of fuel used when cooking the food
    • The distance between the food and the heat source

How to BBQ better and enjoy healthier grilled meat!

The case for meat as a cancer risk has been gaining momentum for years. A number of studies now show that people who report eating diets heavy in red (and processed meats) have higher risks of certain types of cancer, as well as heart disease and other chronic illnesses.

These findings certainly don’t bode well when you want to add barbecuing your meat on top of that!

However, it’s not all doom and gloom, and you still can enjoy the occasional meal that includes grilled meat.

There are plenty of ways you can reduce the levels of HCAs & PAHs in your food:

1. Flavor your food with herbs and spices – some herbs and spices can actually help prevent HCAs from forming due to the antioxidants they contain.

Recommended herbs and spices include:
– rosemary
– basil
– thyme
– sage
– oregano
– onion powder
– turmeric

Did you know that turmeric, an ancient spice that has hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory properties contains beneficial polyphenols and offers powerful antioxidant support?

This is due to its high curcumin content and it works in both fat and water soluble tissues to protect the liver.

2. Cut off and discard charred pieces of meat before serving, as those pieces will contain higher levels of carcinogens. In addition, do not use meat drippings as gravy for your food, as there could be carcinogens in the meat drippings.

3. Certain types of marinades can reduce the levels of HCA and PAH – marinade serves as a barrier between meat and carcinogens.

Acid-based marinades that contain vinegar, lemon juice, lime juice, red wine, and yogurt can reduce the formation of HCA, while beer marinades (particularly marinades made with dark beer) can reduce the formation of PAHs.

You can also brush your food with a small amount of olive oil – just keep in mind, while this can help reduce HCA levels, the fat from the oil dripping on the grill can still increase PAH levels.

4. Use leaner cuts of meat for grilling – the less amount of fat that drips onto the grill, the less amount of PAH that will form.

Avoid grilling meat that is highly processed, such as sausage and ham, since they contain added nitrates and higher amounts of fat.

5. To shorten the cooking time of meat, cut meat into smaller pieces and cook it on medium to medium-high heat (do not cook on high heat).

Kabobs are a great way to utilize smaller pieces of meat and be sure to include some vegetable.

BONUS: vegetables do not create carcinogens, as they do not contain creatine and they lack fat, meaning there won’t be any flare-ups on the grill that result in smoke being created.

6. Clean your grill after each use with a quality brush (one where bristles won’t break off). This will help get rid of any residues from carcinogens that may have built up, and prevent them from being transferred to your food the next time you use your grill.

Research investigating the relationship between grilled food (especially red and processed meat) and cancer risk is ongoing.
[1, 2, 3, 4]

However, by using safer grilling techniques, you will reduce the number of carcinogens that infiltrate your food, making your grilled meat more safe to consume and effectively reducing your cancer risk.


CanPrev RecommendsCurcumin Pro | CanPrev


Referenced Studies

[1] The Lancelet – Oncology, October 2015: Carcinogenicity of Consumption of Red and Processed Meat

[2] Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI), January 2017: Grilled, Barbecued and Smoked Meat Intake and Survival Following Breast Cancer

[3] Journal of Nutrition and Cancer, December 2012: Meat Consumption, Cooking Practices, Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer

[4] Journal of Cancer Science, 2004: Heterocyclic Amines: Mutagens/Carcinogens Produced During Cooking of Meat and Fish

Meet Mia Noblet – Professional Slackliner

Meet Mia Noblet, CanPrev ambassador, Vancouver native and women’s world record slackline holder!

The CanPrev team was fairly new to the sport of slacklining before taking on Mia as an ambassador and we were curious to know more about the sport once she decided to come aboard.

So what’s slacklining all about anyway?

In short, it is the act of balancing or walking (or highlining) along with a suspended length of rope that is tensioned between two anchors. Similar in many ways to slack rope walking – a hobby popular amongst park loungers and circus performers.

We learned that there is more risk in the pre and post climbing routine than the actual walking!

Walks are performed at high peaks so the setup usually consists of long-distance journeys by foot or bike, uphill.

Afterward, great focus and precision are needed to securing the rope – ‘rigging’ it between two anchors. Anchors (in most cases the edge of two mountains) can be over 400 meters apart and usually, the rope is rigged too high up to measure!

Then enough energy must be saved for a safe descent back down to ground level after an un-rigging of the line. The logistics of securing the rope walked upon, requires one to be in top-notch shape no doubt!

One step, then another.

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When Mia was 11 she discovered figure skating, a sport far from her family’s outdoorsy roots. She gave it a try and although skeptical about the dresses and makeup, she realized she enjoyed the athletic challenge.

From there, her competitive and tenacious personality grew along with her athleticism in not only figure skating but many sports.

In fact, in one interview Mia’s mom mentions that she was also a natural skier and her nature-immersed childhood probably had a lot to do with her love for other outdoor sports that she excelled in!

Mia made it to Europe in 2015 (Bern Slackline Fest, Swiss Waterline Tour and Monte Piana Highline Fest in the Dolomites Italy) but before then she had only done a bit of slacklining every summer in between other sports at nearby parks.

Her record holding status proves that Mia is not only a skilled athlete but a true lover of a good outdoor adventure!

World record holder.

Mia quickly gained popularity in the British Columbia Slacklife community, only a year after she started highlining full-time Mia set a new women’s world record holder walking 493m at Caselton (longest Highline).

Watch a clip of Mia’s walk where she broke her first world record.  She has since walked 470m in Moab Utah — watch this mind-blowing Highline by Mia Noblet

In 2017 she set a new world record for longest Highline of 614m on April 21st in Brazil.

Read more at Mountain Culture a magazine representing the Kootenay coast region of Canada that outlines more of Mia’s journey into slacklining!

Words from Mia.

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“I strive to push the sport of highlining to new places while exploring the outdoors further. I love sharing my passion and energy for the great outdoors by connecting with like-minded individuals.

‘Finding my best health’ to me means being able to do what I love longer and so I choose CanPrev products to help fuel my active lifestyle. These supplements have been a fantastic addition to all of my expeditions and travel, keeping my immune system up and recovery time down.”

Mia’s favourite CanPrev products include:

Vitamin D3 + K2

Antioxidant Network

Cold-Pro

Pro-Biotik 15B

Where is Mia now?

Mia has traveled to China, Brazil, Switzerland, Utah, and Germany to perform the most amazing Highline walks.

From what we can tell her traveling schedule isn’t about to slow down. Follow Mia and her extraordinary adventures online: @mianoblet  

Look closely at the banner photo and you will see Mia on a Highline in the mountains of Brazil!

Some photo credits go to Angelo Maragno @angelomaragno